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Nevada

Nevada knife laws are in a state of flux, with multiple changes being proposed and implemented, and others that never come to fruition. The following is the most current summary of Nevada knife law.

Nevada Knife Laws Quick Look

Preemption? Not state-wide, but in some counties.

Concealed carry? No other restrictions.

Open carry? No restrictions.

Schools? Some knives are prohibited within school properties.

Off-limits places:

  • Schools Government
  • offices Buildings where the court is in session
  • Parks or recreational areas with posted signage
  • Airports

Length & critical dimensions: None, However, Clark County has a broad ordinance banning concealed carry of anything that can be used as an offensive weapon and knives with blades more than 3 inches.

Legal Types of Knives In Nevada

The types of knives legal in Nevada include the following:

  • Dirks, daggers, or other stabbing knives.
  • Balisong and Butterfly Knives.
  • Bowie knives and other types of hunting knives.
  • Throwing stars and Knives.

NB: These knives are only legal to own and there may be other restrictions to carry them.

Illegal Type of Knives in Nevada

Switchblades and belt buckle knives are illegal in Nevada.

Nevada Knife Ownership Law

To own a knife in Nevada, you must be 18 years old or older. This law applies to both residents and non-residents of the state. There may be some counties with additional restrictions or preemption that make all knives illegal in certain areas regardless of age.

Nevada Knife Carry Laws

Some of the gun carry laws in Nevada include the following:

Nevada Knife Open Carry Laws

Knife open carry is legal in Nevada, unless not allowed by local regulations.

Nevada Knife Concealed Carry Laws

Concealed carry of knives in Nevada is not allowed for the following:

  • Dirks, daggers, or switchblades
  • Machetes
  • Any knife that is part of a belt buckle
  • Pocket knives

Nevada Laws for Different Types of Knives

Different knife laws in Nevada include the following:

Nevada Automatic Knife Laws

Automatic or switchblade knives are legal in Nevada, unless not allowed by local regulations, but they cannot be concealed carried.

Nevada Balisong / Butterfly Knife Laws

Balisongs and butterfly knives are illegal to own in Clark County, others may apply for a permit. In addition, the law states that balisongs and butterfly knives must be carried concealed and cannot be worn openly.

Nevada Bowie Knife Laws

Bowie knives are legal to own in Nevada, although there may be local restrictions on carrying and use.

Nevada Dirk and Dagger / Dirk and Dagger Laws

Daggers, dirks, switchblades, dirk knives, or any other stabbing knife is illegal in the following counties:

  • Clark County
  • Washoe County
  • Carson City
  • Douglas County
  • Lander County
  • Churchill County
  • Eureka Pershing County

Relevant Nevada Knife Law Statutes & Penal Codes

Nevada knife laws and penal codes include the following:

  • NRS 202.260 Firearms, explosives, and dangerous weapons; possession by persons from certain communities prohibited.
  • NRS 202.265 Weapons, ammunition, or explosives for certain persons prohibited; penalty.
  • NRS 207.180 Unlawful acts; penalties; applicability of section.
  • NRS 207.190 Right to carry certain weapons restricted; exceptions.
  • NRS 207.200 Possession or control of weapon on school property prohibited; penalties; exceptions.
  • NRS 202.265 - Possession of a dangerous weapon with intent to use unlawfully.
  • NRS 202.265 - Possession of a deadly weapon with intent to use unlawfully against the person or property of another.
  • NRS 202.265 - Possession of a deadly weapon with intent to use unlawfully against the person or property.

Nevada Knife Offenses, Defenses, Restrictions & Penalties

They include:

Legal Defenses for Knife Charges 

The self-defense law in this state is fairly wide-ranging. It includes defending a third person as well as the use of non-deadly force for self-protection. Non Deadly force, generally speaking, allows you to use physical force to protect yourself against imminent danger without injuring another person. It also allows you to defend someone else against imminent danger.

To have a valid self-defense claim, you must be faced with a direct threat of harm that is about to happen. You can use force only when necessary to protect yourself or another person from an immediate and unlawful attack, and the amount of force used must not be excessive in relation to the threat.

It is important to note that nondeadly force for self-defense does not apply in the following situations:

  • When a police officer makes an arrest or conducts a search and seizure
  • When a law enforcement official is making an arrest, performing a search, or when executing a warrant.
  • Nevada stands your ground law also does not protect against a claim of the negligent use of a deadly weapon.

Knife law Exceptions for Law Enforcement and Military Personnel

Law enforcement and military personnel are exempt from the restrictions that apply to civilians concerning knife laws in the state. This means that they can bring a concealed or unconcealed knife onto school grounds, the property of another person, into courtrooms, and/or any other place where ordinary citizens cannot carry them.

Restrictions

  • It is a prohibition to possess a knife within school premises.
  • It is a prohibition to possess a knife on another's property without permission.
  • It is a prohibition to possess a knife upon public transportation, including one's own vehicle if there are more than 10 people in the car or truck at the time.
  • It is a prohibition to possess a knife within a secure area of an airport.
  • It is a prohibition to carry any weapon in the commission of a crime.

Penalties for Knife Related Offenses in Nevada.

  • If a person is convicted of carrying a concealed knife, where it is not permitted, the minimum penalty is a 30-day jail sentence. A convicted person can face up to six months in prison and/or a $1,000 fine for that offense.
  • If convicted of possession of a knife with the intent to use unlawfully against another person, a person may face six months in prison and/or a $5,000 fine.
  • If a person is found transporting concealed weapons on their property without permission, the minimum sentence is 30-days in jail. A convicted person can face up to six months in prison and/or a $1,000 fine for that offense.
  • If a person is found violating the knife laws on school grounds, the minimum penalty is 30-days in jail. A convicted person can face up to six months in prison and/or a $1,000 fine for that offense.

Nevada Knife Law FAQs

Some of the most frequently asked questions and answers about Nevada knife laws include the following:       

  • How Long Can a Knife Be in Nevada?

There is no statutory length for a legal knife. Any knife that can be considered "deadly" according to common sense cannot be carried concealed on one's person, either in everyday life or in certain specific situations.

  • What Types of Knives are Illegal in Nevada?

Most knives are only illegal to conceal carry, both legal to own in Nevada.

  • What types of knives are legal to carry in Nevada?

Balisongs, also known as butterfly knives, are legal to own and carry in Nevada. Also, Bowie knives are legal to own and carry in Nevada.

  • What is the length limit for pocket knives in Nevada?

There is no statutory length limit.

  • Can I sell or transfer ownership of a knife in Nevada?

Yes. Knives are regulated on a state level, and there are no restrictions in Nevada limiting the sale or transfer of ownership of any knives except for butterfly knives.

  • Is it Illegal to scare someone with (brandish) a knife in Nevada?

Brandishing a knife is illegal and can result in a conviction. There are two exceptions to that, 1) it is legal to brandish a knife with intent to harm an animal or 2) if your life depended on it (for example you were being attacked by the same animal).

  • Can a minor carry a knife in Nevada?

Unless accompanied by a parent or guardian (over 18), it is illegal for minors to carry knives in Nevada.

  • Are swords legal in Nevada?

Swords are legal to own in Nevada. There is no length law for swords, nor any laws preventing the carrying of swords in public (concealed or unconcealed). However, it is illegal to brandish a sword as a weapon without lawful cause.

  • Are switchblades legal in Nevada?

Nevada law has a specific descriptor for switchblades, which are considered a category of knives. Switchblades and all other knife categories are legal to own in Nevada.

  • Are folding knives legal in Nevada?

Folding knives are legal to own and carry in Nevada. There is no length limit or restriction on folding knives in Nevada.

  • Are fixed blade knives legal in Nevada?

Fixed blade knives are legal to own and carry in Nevada. There is no length limit or restriction on fixed blade knives in Nevada.

  • Are butterfly knives legal in Nevada?

Butterfly knives are legal to own in Nevada. Butterfly knives can be carried concealed or unconcealed, but cannot be opened with wrist action.

  • Are automatic knives legal in Nevada?

Automatic knives (switchblades) are legal to own in Nevada. Automatic knives can be carried concealed or unconcealed, but cannot be opened with wrist action.

  • Are spring-assisted knives legal in Nevada?

Spring-assisted knives are legal to own and carry in Nevada. There is no length limit or restriction on spring-assisted knives in Nevada.

  • Are gravity knives illegal in Nevada?

Gravity knives are legal to own in Nevada. Gravity knives cannot be carried concealed and can only be opened with one hand (as opposed to a two-step action of unfolding the blade).

  • Are throwing knives legal in Nevada?

Throwing knives are legal to own in Nevada. There is no length limit or restriction on throwing knives in Nevada.

  • Are karambits Legal in Nevada?

Karambits are legal to own in Nevada. There is no length limit or restriction of karambits in Nevada, making them commonly used for martial arts and Filipino knife fighting.